HUC Monthly Meeting-Special Guest from the MA Behavioral Health Help Line

Hingham Public Library - Whiton Room 66 Leavitt St, Hingham, MA, United States

We will start off this month's meeting by hearing from Ashleigh Miller of the Massachusetts Behavioral Health Helpline. The BHHL is the state’s “front door” for behavioral health needs, connecting callers to the full range of treatment services for mental health and substance use throughout the Commonwealth. The BHHL helps in real time with immediate crisis intervention, urgent, and routine needs and is available 24/7/365 in 200+ languages. The BHHL is accessible to both consumers and providers seeking resources for patients. We hope you will join us for this presentation (those who do not wish to stay for the "business" part of our meeting are welcome to leave after the presentation!)

Let’s Talk Disabilities: Words with Neighbors 2.0

Hingham Heritage Museum 34 Main Street, Hingham, MA, United States

Join us for an afternoon of conversations related to disabilities that will broaden your understanding and allow deeper connections with friends and neighbors. Whether you are familiar with this topic or just interested in learning more, all are welcome to this “judgement free” small group, moderated setting. Topics may include such things as disability terminology and etiquette; exploring IEPs/504s; understanding mental health disabilities; and housing availability for disabled adults. Co-sponsored by Hingham SEPAC. Register

Free

Community Book Discussion of Disability Visibility

Hingham Public Library - Whiton Room 66 Leavitt St, Hingham, MA, United States

Please join us for a discussion of Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the 21st Century. Register below to help us plan! From Goodreads: One in five people in the United States lives with a disability. Some disabilities are visible, others less apparent—but all are underrepresented in media and popular culture. Now, just in time for the thirtieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, activist Alice Wong brings together this urgent, galvanizing collection of contemporary essays by disabled people. From Harriet McBryde Johnson’s account of her debate with Peter Singer over her own personhood to original pieces by authors like Keah Brown and Haben Girma; from blog posts, manifestos, and eulogies to Congressional testimonies, and beyond: this anthology gives a glimpse into the rich complexity of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community. It invites readers to question their own understandings. It celebrates and documents disability culture in the now. It looks to the future and the past with hope and love. Register here:

Free

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